Te tautīaki o te mate pukupuku me mate Korona

Cancer Care and COVID-19

Information and guidance on cancer and screening services during the COVID-19 response.

COVID-19 Reports

This series of reports analyses the impact of COVID-19 on cancer services at both a national and DHB level. The initial report rapidly measured the impact of the COVID-19 lockdown on cancer care. The ongoing monthly reports enable recovery tracking and DHB support.

Initial Impact of COVID-19 on Cancer Services Report 2020

This report found that cancer treatment services were largely maintained during the COVID-19 lockdown. This was the result of a rapid collective response from the cancer sector across New Zealand. However, there was a large disruption to diagnostic services, contributing to a significant reduction in new cancer diagnoses. In general, the disruptions to the cancer care pathway have not increased inequities for Māori to date.

COVID-19 and Cancer Reports to End May 2020

These reports shows an increase in new registrations and diagnostic procedures in May compared to April 2020. The overall number of diagnostic procedures and new cancer registrations in 2020 remains lower than 2019. The disruptions to diagnostic services seen in April 2020 are now showing up in medical oncology, radiation oncology and haematology services, with fewer attendances in May.

Broken down by DHB:
Nationally:

COVID-19 and Cancer Report to End June 2020

There has been a substantial increase in new cancer registrations and diagnostic procedures in June compared to May 2020. This report shows that we are catching up on cancer registrations from the lockdown period. The overall number of diagnostic procedures and new cancer registrations in 2020 remains lower than 2019. Cancer treatment services – surgery, medical oncology, radiation oncology and haematology – continued during the COVID-19 lockdown and continue to be delivered at pre-COVID volumes.

COVID-19 and Cancer Report to End July 2020

There continues to be an increase in new cancer registrations and diagnostic procedures in July 2020. This report shows that we are continuing to catch up on the dip in cancer registrations seen over the lockdown period. The overall number of diagnostic procedures and new cancer registrations in 2020 remains somewhat lower than 2019, but the gap continues to close. Cancer treatment services – surgery, medical oncology, radiation oncology and haematology – continued during the COVID-19 lockdown and continue to be delivered at pre-COVID volumes in the months since.

COVID-19 and Cancer Report to End August 2020

There continues to be an increase in new cancer registrations in August 2020. This report shows we have nearly caught up on the dip in cancer registrations seen over the lockdown period. Cancer treatment services – surgery, medical oncology, radiation oncology and haematology – continued during the COVID-19 lockdown and continue to be delivered at pre-COVID volumes in the months since.

COVID-19 and Cancer Report to End October 2020

There has now been the same number of new cancer diagnoses made in 2020 as were made in 2019. In general, the COVID-19 response does not appear to have increased inequities in the cancer system; however, the concerning exception is lung cancer. This report includes a section looking at lung cancer in more detail, aiming to describe the inequities in detail and consider what the potential drivers of these inequities are.